Principal Anne Atkin Bulletin, October 7 2018

St. Francis of Assisi- A lesson in Compassion

Prayer to St. Francis

Lord make me an instrument of your peace

Where there is hatred let me sow love

Where there is injury, pardon

Where there is doubt, faith

Where there is despair, hope

Where there is darkness, light

And where there is sadness, joy

O divine master grant that I may

not so much seek to be consoled as to console

to be understood as to understand

To be loved as to love

For it is in giving that we receive

it is in pardoning that we are pardoned

And it’s in dying that we are born to eternal life

Amen

 

I don’t know about you, but every time we sing this song in church, I cry a little (or a lot depending on what is going on in my life).  What is it?  What makes this song so powerful? I can’t remember if it made me cry before I had children, but I am guessing it didn’t.  This song is a complete picture of what it looks like to love completely.  The love that makes you small so that others can grow big in your love. The love that lets your issues stay tucked away while you put your family’s growth and importance at the top of the list.  It is in digging this deep into your own soul that you can become compassionate.  I have read articles on how to teach compassion to children.  To teach them that other’s suffering is their concern.  That it is important to be able to put yourself in someone else’s misfortune. I wonder if it is something that we can even teach though.  Compassion is not a virtue but love is.  I make the argument that we can teach our children to love that when we love God, with our whole heart and soul, that we open our hearts to compassion.  St. Francis had compassion.  And that is why he is the most popular saint since the Virgin Mary.  He lived a life that was serious about literally living out Christ’s work.  We celebrated him as the Patron Saint of animals today at our Pet blessing but he really shows us all how to have the greatest compassion for all of God’s creatures; especially the human ones.  I love the prayer to Saint Francis and I am grateful for the chance to love with all my soul, soul, soul!

God Bless,

Anne Atkin, Principal

 

Fr. Todd Bulletin, October 7 2018

Dear Sacred Heart Family,

Last weekend Fr. Tomy and I went perch fishing on Lake Erie.  Fr. Tomy beat all of us- it seemed every time we looked to the back of the boat he was reeling in a fish!  It was a great time.

On this past Tuesday, October 2nd we celebrated the feast of the Guardian Angels.  This feast day reminds us how close Heaven is to us, that on this journey through life we are never unaccompanied.  I know there are moments I can look back in my life where my safety and protection in particular situations seems only explainable through divine intervention.  I wanted to include part of an article that delves into our understanding and belief in Guardian angels.

http://www.ncregister.com/blog/jimmy-akin/8-things-to-know-and-share-about-the-guardian-angels

 

What is a guardian angel?

A guardian angel is an angel (a created, non-human, non-corporeal being) that has been assigned to guard a particular person, especially with respect to helping that person avoid spiritual dangers and achieve salvation.

The angel may also help the person avoid physical dangers, particularly if this will help the person achieve salvation.

 

Where do we read about guardian angels in Scripture?

We see angels helping people on various occasions in Scripture, but there are certain instances in which we see angels providing a protective function over a period of time.  In Tobit, Raphael is assigned to an extended mission to help Tobit’s son (and his family in general).  In Daniel, Michael is described as “the great prince who has charge of your [Daniel’s] people” (Dan. 12:1). He is thus depicted as the guardian angel of Israel.  In the Gospels, Jesus indicates that there are guardian angels for individuals, including little children. He says:  See that you do not despise one of these little ones; for I tell you that in heaven their angels always behold the face of my Father who is in heaven (Matt. 18:10).

 

What does Jesus mean when he says these angels “always behold” the fact of the Father?

It may mean that they are constantly standing in his presence in heaven and able to communicate the needs of their charges to him.  Alternately, based on the idea that angels are messengers (Greek, angelos = “messenger”) in the heavenly court, it may mean that whenever these angels seek access to the heavenly court, they are always granted it and allowed to present the needs to their charges to God.

 

What does the Church teach about guardian angels?

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church: From its beginning until death, human life is surrounded by their watchful care and intercession. Beside each believer stands an angel as protector and shepherd leading him to life. Already here on earth the Christian life shares by faith in the blessed company of angels and men united in God [CCC 336].

 

Who has guardian angels?

It is considered theologically certain that each member of the faith has a special guardian angel from the time of baptism.  This view is reflected in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which speaks of “each believer” having a guardian angel.  This understanding is reflected in an Angelus address by Benedict XVI, who stated:

Dear friends, the Lord is ever close and active in humanity’s history and accompanies us with the unique presence of his Angels, whom today the Church venerates as “Guardian Angels”, that is, ministers of the divine care for every human being.  From the beginning until the hour of death, human life is surrounded by their constant protection [Angelus, Oct. 2, 2011].

 

God Bless,

Fr. Todd

 

Mission Appeal, October 6-7

Annual Mission Appeal

October 6-7

Each year, a missionary is assigned to our parish from the diocesan Mission Office for an appeal asking our assistance for the very poor.  The weekend of  October 6-7, we will welcome Fr. Gary Weismann, on behalf of the Diocese of Mandeville, Jamaica.  Please consider supporting the evangelization programs and outreach to the extremely poor people of this diocese in our second collection.

 

From Fr. Gary……

When we think of Jamaica, we think of Ocho Rios, beautiful beaches, vacations and wonderful scenery.  But, Jamaica is among the poorest countries in our hemisphere and the Diocese of Mandeville is the poorest of the three dioceses in Jamaica where 68% of the people have no running water.  25% of youth are “functionally illiterate;” there is an alarming number of destitute elderly and abandoned children; and, the average Sunday collection is 10% of the operating cost.  On behalf of the Diocese of Mandeville, we thank you for your prayers and support or our poor.