Deacon’s Corner, June 24 2018

We rush to church, get there just in time for Mass, then sit down only to be distracted.  Maybe it’s something different in church, someone to talk to, or just getting the kids settled into the pew.  When that happens, here are a few simple tips to help stay focused:

 Begin to prepare before you arrive:  Drive to church in silence.  Turn off the radio.  Shut your phone off.  Leave those important conversations for after Mass.  Let the silence sink in to transition your mind from the secular to the sacred.

Get to Mass early and pray.  If praying is difficult, just sit and talk to God.  Remind yourself you are in His presence and about to receive Jesus in the Eucharist.  Thank Him for this gift of grace.  The more time, the better, but ten minutes before Mass is better than none at all.

Sit close to the front.  The front pews are the best seats in the house.  But they are often empty during Mass.  Kimberly and I discovered when our kids were very young they behaved better in the front pew than the back pew.  They were fascinated to watch what was going on.  It works for adults too.

Keep your hands folded in prayer.  Posture is important.  Your body reminds your heart and mind what they should be doing.  Keep a reverent posture while sitting, standing, and kneeling.  After all, you are in the presence of the King of the Universe!

Participate in the Mass.  Mass is not a spectator sport. You are not there to be entertained.  Say the prayers and sing the songs.  Listen to the Scriptures.  Wonder how they are speaking to you.  Live in the Sacred Mystery of the bread and wine becoming the Precious Body and Blood of Jesus.  The more you stay engaged, the more rewarding Mass is to your mind.

Bring back those wandering thoughts.  Mass is the highest level of prayer we offer God.  It’s the place where heaven and earth are joined.  St Francis de Sales said if the heart wanders, gently bring it back into the Lord’s presence.  Remind yourself you are in the Lord’s presence!

Add your prayers and sacrifices to those of the Mass.  You bring your special prayer intentions and your personal sacrifices to every Mass.  Offer them up Mass.  When the priest says “Pray brethren, that my sacrifice AND YOURS may be acceptable to God, the almighty Father” consciously think of what these are for you.

Ask for help.  Your Guardian Angel is always with you.  Simply ask your guardian angel, who is adoring Christ in the eternal Mass along with you, to help you pray well and stay attentive.

We live in a fast-paced world.  When we bring that world into Mass, so many things are bouncing around in our heads that we forget the most important thing happening in our world in that moment – Jesus is in the house!  May we pray to stay focused at Mass and enjoy the special time in the presence of our God.

Deacon John

 

Fr. Joe Bulletin, June 24 2018

Greetings in Christ!

I want to start this off with a reminder for us all.  Next week is a big one for our Sacred Heart family.  We begin our massive project of repairing the floors all through the Church, re-carpeting and all sorts of yummy goodness, including work on the entrances and exits.  Because of that, the only masses we will celebrate from July 2-6 is on July 4th at St. Mary on the Lake at 9:00am.   We will pray mass together that day and ask God to bless our country and help us to grow closer to Him.

The Catholic Church also offers us a pretty big celebration this week: On Friday, we celebrate the Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul.  This is the day when we remember the martyrdom of both of these extraordinary men.  It’s unclear why this date is picked: its either because one of them died on that date or because it is the day their relics were moved to Rome…we are not sure which.

Either way, its a time to remember their deaths and honor the faith, hope, love and courage that gave them the strength to lay down their lives for Our Faith.

St. Peter was crucified upside down on Vatican Hill in Rome in the year 64 AD, during the reign of Nero.

In 1950 human bones were discovered beneath the alter of St. Peter’s Basilica and many claimed they belonged to Peter. In 1953 an excavation found St. Peter’s tomb in Jerusalem bearing his previous name Simon, as well as the tombs of the other apostles, Mary, and Jesus.

In the 1960s, discarded debris from the excavation beneath St. Peter’s Basilica were re-examined and were identified as the bones of a male human. This discovery caused Pope Paul VI in 1968 to announce they were likely to belong to the Apostle Peter. On November 24, 2013, Pope Francis revealed the relics of nine bone fragments for the first time in public during a Mass celebrated at St. Peter’s Square.

As for St. Paul, he was beheaded in 67AD, also by Nero. As an interesting sidenote, St. John Chrysostom wrote that Nero actually knew St. Paul personally.  St. Paul’s body rests at St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome.

In 2006 National Geographic confirmed the remains were his.  You can read about that discovery here:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/vaticancityandholysee/5685157/Bone-fragments-confirmed-to-be-Saint-Paul.html

Let’s pray to stay faithful to that which was handed on to us by the wonderful Sts. Peter and Paul!

fjk

 

Vietnam Memorial Wall

 

The Hudson American Legion Hannan-Colvin Post 180 will be hosting the Vietnam Memorial Moving Wall on August 9-13 in the East parking lot at Hudson High School.

We are in need of help with setting up and tearing down, as well as helping visitors and people to assist with parking cars and guarding the wall 24 hours a day while it is here.

Base construction will start on Sunday, August 5 about 2:00pm and tear down will commence August 13 at 1:00pm.

Please consider helping with this worthwhile community project.  Time slots are available, please contact Jim Friedrich at 517-448-0039.  Donations are being accepted to help defray the cost of bringing the Memorial Wall to Hudson

 

Please Note:

The Parish office will be closed the following dates:  June 14 & 15 AND July 4, 5, 6

Due to our renovation projects, there will be NO Daily Masses June 18 & 19 and the week of July 2-6.  

Beginning July 7, our Masses will be held in the parish hall.

Sacred Heart Family Fun Golf Outing ~ July 14, 2018

 

Click here to download 2018 flyer

Entry Fee:  $40 per person (members & non-members)

Get your son, daughter, father, mother, brother, sister, niece, nephew, grandma, grandpa and anyone you can think of to sign up for this event.    Teams of 4!   If you don’t have a full group, that’s ok too ~ we’ll find someone for you to team up with.   DEADLINE FOR TEAM REGISTRATION IS Wednesday, July 11

 

Enrollment

It is enrollment season at Sacred Heart School.

At Sacred Heart our teaching approach is focused on virtue. Character and moral purpose are not just add-ons, they’re at the heart of everything we do. Obedience, courtesy and respect are the foundation of our academic life. The virtues are what make children feel safe, appreciated and encouraged- free to discover their talents; develop their personalities; build lasting friendships; become balanced, confident people of faith. This is our educational vision at Sacred Heart. Our mission to remain deliberate and structured with the purpose of graduating students who are prepared to persevere.

Please take a few minutes to explore our website at www.sacredhearthudson.org which describes our preschool through 6th grade programs.  Then consider how Sacred Heart can enrich your child’s life and the life of your whole family.

Anyone who is interested in Catholic education for their child should call 517-448-6405 or email me at aatkin@sacredhearthudson.org to set up an interview and a shadow day.

Fr. Joe Homily, June 10 2018

Evil is out there, we see it all the time.  We may work with people who are evil, we may daily deal with people who are evil.  It’s out there and we see the effects of that.   What do we do?  We need to recognize and pick out evil is at work.  We need to know when evil is at work around us, in us or God help us, through us.

FAITH FEST, June 23 2018

Bishop Earl Boyea seeks to further “equip the Household of Faith” to become disciples of Christ so that, in His friendship, they can reach out and evangelize the wider community. Among the initiatives to achieve this goal, FaithFest offers families and young people a day of live music, social and recreational activities, food, fireworks and fun — all  centered around a vigil Mass held “under the stars.” This extraordinary family festival will take place on the grounds of St. Francis Retreat Center, a beautiful 95-acre campus, where rolling hills, wooded trails and ample accommodations permit a unique and memorable summer festival of faith. Don’t miss it!

FAITH FEST is a day for Christian families to gather together and celebrate their faith in an atmosphere of upbeat, joyful participation! Parish and school groups, youth ministries, small groups or large apostolates — all are welcome to reunite at FaithFest!

Attend Mass “under the stars” as Bishop Earl Boyea, assisted by priests and deacons of the diocese, celebrates a unique liturgy with musical direction from Matt Maher.

 

Deacon’s Corner, June 17 2018

Why do we go to Mass?  Essentially, we go to grow spiritually and worship as a faith community.  At Mass, we profess what we believe and bear witness to Christ by openly celebrating our Catholic faith before the world.  We go to Mass to share in the wonder of God’s love and be transformed by the Spirit of holiness.  When that happens, we go forward to live our faith and share with others that there is something greater in life to come.

Our Mass has not changed much over the past 2000 years.  In 155 AD, St Justin Martyr wrote a letter to Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius to explain and defend how the Early Christians worshiped.  St. Justin wrote: “On the day we call the day of the sun [Sunday], all who dwell in the city or country gather in the same place.  The memoirs of the apostles and the writings of the prophets are read, as much as time permits.  When the reader has finished, he who presides over those gathered admonishes and challenges them to imitate these beautiful things.  Then we all rise together and offer prayers for ourselves…and for others, wherever they may be, so that we may be found righteous by our actions, and faithful to the commandments, so as to obtain eternal salvation.  When the prayers are concluded we exchange the kiss.  Then someone brings bread and a cup of water and wine mixed together to him who presides over the brethren.  He takes them and offers praise and glory to the Father of the universe, through the name of the Son and of the Holy Spirit and for a considerable time he gives thanks [in Greek: eucharistian] that we have been judged worthy of these gifts.   When he has concluded the prayers and thanksgivings, all present give voice to an acclamation by saying “Amen.”  When he who presides has given thanks and the people have responded, those whom we call deacons give to those present the eucharisted bread, wine and water and take them to those who are absent.”  Ten years after he wrote this, Marcus Aurelius had St. Justin condemned, scourged, & beheaded for not worshiping Roman gods.  St Justin Martyr loved the Mass and gave his life for it.

In his book, Rediscovering Catholicism, Matthew Kelly writes Catholics have lost their sense of wonder about the Mass.  He asks are we “so unaware of the mystery and the privilege [of the Mass] that we can hardly wait to get out of church?”  He says if we truly believe Christ is present in the Eucharist, then the power unleashed within us through receiving the Eucharist is “unfathomable.”  But we cannot experience this feeling if we simply go to Mass because it’s our Sunday “obligation” or someone told us to.  The only way to grow spiritually at Mass and enjoy the camaraderie of our faith community is to rediscover the same wonder those First Christians experienced celebrating Jesus’ presence among them when He said, ‘do this in memory of me’.

Deacon John

 

Fr. Joe Bulletin, June 17 2018

 

Greetings in Christ!

I pray that these warm days in Michigan bring you great joy, productive work and wonderful time with you family. Speaking of family, it is Father’ Day. I want to take this opportunity to thank the Lord for my dad. The older I get the more I realize I will probably never finish learning all the beautiful things he has to teach me. Let’s all pray for our dad weather living on earth or in heaven.

This is going to be an unusual week at our parish families……

The bad news is that Tammy, Fr. Tomy and Deacon John are all going to be away and you guys are stuck with me!

The good news is that Bishop Sean will be here throughout the week and we will carry the mass schedule as best we can, as well as any emergencies that may pop up.

Bishop Sean is going to offer Bible Study this week at Sacred Heart on Wednesday night at 6pm.   I haven’t asked him what topic he would like to cover, but I’m sure that he will knock it out of the park as he usual does!

On Thursday of this week, we celebrate St. Aloysius Gonzaga, a Jesuit priest.  Here’s a little bit on him from Catholic.org:

¨ St. Aloysius was born in Castiglione, Italy. The first words St. Aloysius spoke were the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary. He was destined for the military by his father (who was in service to Philip II), but by the age of 9 Aloysius had decided on a religious life, and made a vow of perpetual virginity.

¨ A kidney disease prevented St. Aloysius from a full social life for a while, so he spent his time in prayer and reading the lives of the saints. Although he was appointed a page in Spain, St. Aloysius kept up his many devotions and austerities, and was quite resolved to become a Jesuit. His family eventually moved back to Italy, where he taught catechism to the poor. When he was 18, he joined the Jesuits, after finally breaking down his father, who had refused his entrance into the order.

¨ He served in a hospital during the plague of 1587 in Milan, and died from it at the age of 23 after speaking the Holy name of Jesus for his last words.

¨ He received his First Holy Communion from St. Charles Borromeo and his Last Rites from St. Robert Bellarmine.  St. Robert went on to write a book about the life of St. Aloysius.

May God bless us to hunger for Him like St. Aloysius did and pour ourselves out in loving service to those in need!

God bless you all

FJK