Online Giving

Lent is a time of discipline.And the discipline of stewardship—of planned and consistent giving—is appropriate for this time. As you spend time in contemplation this season, consider planning your giving for this season as well as seasons to come. You can use Online Giving—our secure giving option accessible through our church website—to plan and give this season. You can use Online Giving for your regular tithes or to contribute to special funds.   Please click on the link below to sign up for Online Giving.

Online Giving

 

Mrs. Atkin Bulletin February 25, 2018

Join the 100 Club

The support of the 100 Club is a blessing.  As you know, our parents make financial sacrifices to send their kids to a school that can put God into every part of the day. From the moment the doors open, the hallways and classrooms are filled with guidance from the Holy Spirit. It is evident from the joy on the student’s faces that they are guided to use their God given talents to meet challenges and live to their full potential.

This year the money received from the 100 Club will go directly back to the students. The teachers have a wish list for the classrooms that will brighten up the days for the children. After being in school for nearly 100 days, they have pinpointed a couple of items that will really enhance the learning environment.

 

Wish List

Preschool ~ New shelving unit and sand/water table

Kindergarten ~ Shelves and educational games

1st/2nd ~ Bean Bag chairs for the reading corner

3rd/4th ~ flexible seating chairs (proven to improve attention and focus)

5th/6th ~ New books to help rebuild the library for older students.

Music ~ Glockenspiels (can be used for all age levels to learn music and for performances)

Art ~ Table easels

 

To join the 100 Club, simply send your $100 donation to the Parish Office, marked as 100 Club. Your donation to the 100 Club can make all of the difference to the students.

Thank you for your vision that Sacred Heart School will continue to inspire the next generation of faithful, lifelong learners.

 May God Bless You,

Anne Atkin, principal

 

Deacon John Bulletin Article February 25, 2018

Deacon’s Corner

The finger pointing after the tragedy in a Florida high school 10 days ago was all too familiar.  Some said it could have been avoided if guns were outlawed.  Others said we need more guns.  Some blamed poor health care or a broken educational system.  Some even blamed God.  So, where does the blame lie?  And just why would God allow evil in the world?  Those questions have no simple answers.  So, let’s start with what we know.

We know God loves everyone and that He is All-good.   We also know from experience that God allows suffering in the world.   Even ‘good’ people suffer the effects of evil, sometimes even more so than ‘bad’ people.  To answer these questions, we must first appreciate the nature of evil.  Evil does not exist by itself.  Evil results from the absence of good.  What we call “evil” is really the failure to live up to the purpose God created us for.  God gave each of us the gift of free will with the ability to choose to follow His will or reject it.  So, evil is the vacuum created when whenever we choose not to reach the true fulfillment of our lives as God intended. When we consider the evil in the world and the suffering caused by it – murder, drug abuse, rape, war, poverty, to name a few – we can see evil results directly from choosing not to respect God or love our neighbor.

So, evil exists because of the choices we make.  Sadly, choosing to sin can affect many, so the innocent often suffer along with the guilty.  Even so, God looks for us to do a good from the consequences of an evil.  St. Thomas Aquinas wrote in the 13th Century, “There is nothing to prevent human nature’s being raised up to something greater, even after sin. God permits evil in order to draw forth some greater good. Thus St Paul says, ‘Where sin increased, grace abounded all the more.’

So, what caused this latest tragedy?  Quite frankly, I don’t know.  Mother Theresa said, “We must not be surprised when we hear of murders, of killings, of war, of hatred.  If a mother can kill her own child, what is left but for us to kill each other?”   The answer to what happened in Florida lies somewhere in how well our culture embraces God and valuing (or not) the dignity of human life.  Those are things not resolved with laws, political agendas, Facebook, or sensationalism in the news.  Embracing God and respecting life is something that grows in the heart as we strive for holiness, perfection, and being in total union with God.  When we choose to be with God, not separated from Him, we can build a culture of life where evil can’t exist.  When that happens, our world becomes a better place to live.

Adapted from “Introduction to Catholicism for Adults” by Rev. James Socias

 

Fr. Joe Bulletin Article February 25, 2018

Greetings in Christ!
I am so excited for this Lenten Season.  I cannot encourage us strongly enough to keep pushing through and giving all we have in acts of Prayer, Fasting (or sacrifice) and Charity.  This is a time for us to go all out in our internal war with the flesh: rejecting sin and embracing virtue.
Each week, I hope to have my homilies posted so that you can catch any of the series you may have missed on the 7 deadly sins and the virtues to combat those sins.
Remember: it is never too late to start or restart lent…
A reminder that this Saturday, we will have our penance service for both of our Parish Families.  We will gather at St. Mary on the Lake at 10:00am and move pretty quickly into individual reconciliation.  We’ll have handouts there to help you if you need and lots of priests.  PLEASE don’t pass up this wonderful opportunity to meet our Lenten Obligation and give our sins to the Lord.  We’ll receive His mercy, joy and strength in return: a darn good deal. 🙂
I had some wonderful questions from some folks who felt challenged by the homily on greed and gluttony and, as a result, wanted to sort through their stuff and see what they could part with that other people may need.  I’m so blessed that we have taken up that challenge!  If you find yourself with clothing or other such things that you’d like to pass on to the poor, please make sure and do so. If you are out of options on that front, let me know and I’ll try to organize some way to get them where they will do the most good.
May God bless, strengthen and inform our efforts to be holy.  I’m so blessed to be your priest.

From the Pastor’s Desk, February 18 Bulletin

 

Greetings in Christ!

A blessed and holy Lenten Season to you all!  For the next 40 days, we are challenged to "take it up a notch": to focus on fasting, prayer and almsgiving (charity).  This is a time to be conscious of our sin (not other people's sin!) and make sure that we abstain from meat on Fridays during this season.  It's also important that we get to confession and, as a result, there are tons of options in our area to make sure we don't wait till the last minute or miss it entirely.

I'm going to try something new for this Lenten Season: I'm going to preach Themed Homilies.  The idea of a themed homily is a minor custom in the Church where the priest prayerfully chooses a theme for a Season and preaches that theme as opposed to focusing on a particular reading.  I was going to do this last year, but it involves a lot more preparation time than I had so I spent the last year tinkering on and off with a schedule and prepping the homilies so that I would be ready for this year.   God is so good...He really helped and guided me on this and I'm blessed.

 

So...what's the theme? …..."The 7 Deadly Sins and the 7 Cardinal Virtues".  Here's how it will look:

Feb 18 - Greed & Gluttony/Generosity & Abstinence

Feb 25 - Envy/Gratitude

March 4 - Anger/Patience

March 10 - Lust/Chastity

March 18 - Pride/Humility

March 25 - Sloth/Diligence

A couple notes on this: When we look at Lust/Chastity, I found I was uncomfortable preaching it in congregations that have little ones, which would be every congregation.  As a result, I chose to do it for the March 10th weekend because I will be away.  What I'll do is, instead of preaching a homily, I'll write one and send it to the bulletin so you can read it at your leisure.

Palm Sunday is a tough one: it is one of the longer masses of the year and even without a homily, is going to be close to impossible to preach anything substantial because I'll have to fly out of Church to get to the next mass on time. So, that is the Sunday I'll preach on Sloth/Diligence and again, most of it will probably be written, unless I figure a way to trim it more than I have already.

I'm excited about this and hope that God bears great fruit in all our lives as a result.  I know that, just working on these and praying about them, I was convicted of a lot of sins in my life that I had lost track of...praise the Lord!

As everyone and their brother knows, its flu season and, according to the CDC, its one of the worst on record.  As a result of that, I'm going to do one thing and ask you to do two:

First, I'm going to set aside the Precious Blood for now.  I hate doing this, but it really seems like something we need to do.  Normally, I'm a fan of trusting people to not go to The Cup if they are sick, but it seems that, with this virus you can be sick for four days before you even know it.    If you are scheduled to offer the precious blood, please come forward as usual.  We will replace the Precious Blood with two more stations of the Sacred Body.

The two things I'll ask you to do are:

Not hold hands during the Our Father.  I'm not a fan of this practice and I don't want my motives to get muddled up into the problem.  However, I've had a couple people tell me that, when they don't hold hands at the Our Father because they are sick, they get "a look" from others that indicates they are offended.  I assume that we all have more than enough drama in our lives that we don't need more, so we'll just say "No" to holding hands during the Our Father.  According to the rubrics, the appropriate posture during the Our Father is our hands together near our heart.

The second thing is that, during the Sign of Peace, please either bow to each other or accept that some people are not going to shake hands/hug because of their sickness or desire to not get sick.  It's not a rejection of you or your desire to share a sign of Christ's Peace: its more a practical thing to keep us all as healthy as we can.

So...there it is!  I hope you read this section in the spirit I am offering it: a spirit of affection and respect.

I pray that God bless and convict each of us to enter into this Lenten Season with our whole heart, mind and soul!

fjk

 

 

 

 

Welcome to our new Website!

Welcome!

We have been working diligently on creating a new website to bring you as much information as possible for Sacred Heart Church and School.  You are currently set up to receive weekly updates!!

Please take a few minutes to look around our website.  We are continually adding and updating information.

May God bless you during this Season of Lent.