To preview our 2018 Lenten Schedule, please click on the link below.

Lenten Schedule

 

Journey to the Foot of the Cross – 10 Things to Remember For Lent

Journey to the Foot of the Cross:
Bishop Ricken Offers 10 Things to Remember For Lent

Bishop David L. Ricken of Green Bay, Wisconsin, former chairman of the Committee on Evangelization and Catechesis of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), offers “10 Things to Remember for Lent”:

  1. Remember the formula. The Church does a good job capturing certain truths with easy-to-remember lists and formulas: 10 Commandments, 7 sacraments, 3 persons in the Trinity. For Lent, the Church gives us almost a slogan—Prayer, Fasting and Almsgiving—as the three things we need to work on during the season.
  2. It’s a time of prayer. Lent is essentially an act of prayer spread out over 40 days. As we pray, we go on a journey, one that hopefully brings us closer to Christ and leaves us changed by the encounter with him.
  3. It’s a time to fast. With the fasts of Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, meatless Fridays, and our personal disciplines interspersed, Lent is the only time many Catholics these days actually fast. And maybe that’s why it gets all the attention. “What are you giving up for Lent? Hotdogs? Beer? Jelly beans?” It’s almost a game for some of us, but fasting is actually a form of penance, which helps us turn away from sin and toward Christ.
  4. It’s a time to work on discipline. The 40 days of Lent are also a good, set time to work on personal discipline in general. Instead of giving something up, it can be doing something positive. “I’m going to exercise more. I’m going to pray more. I’m going to be nicer to my family, friends and coworkers.”
  5. It’s about dying to yourself. The more serious side of Lenten discipline is that it’s about more than self-control – it’s about finding aspects of yourself that are less than Christ-like and letting them die. The suffering and death of Christ are foremost on our minds during Lent, and we join in these mysteries by suffering, dying with Christ and being resurrected in a purified form.
  6. Don’t do too much. It’s tempting to make Lent some ambitious period of personal reinvention, but it’s best to keep it simple and focused. There’s a reason the Church works on these mysteries year after year. We spend our entire lives growing closer to God. Don’t try to cram it all in one Lent. That’s a recipe for failure.
  7. Lent reminds us of our weakness. Of course, even when we set simple goals for ourselves during Lent, we still have trouble keeping them. When we fast, we realize we’re all just one meal away from hunger. In both cases, Lent shows us our weakness. This can be painful, but recognizing how helpless we are makes us seek God’s help with renewed urgency and sincerity.
  8. Be patient with yourself. When we’re confronted with our own weakness during Lent, the temptation is to get angry and frustrated. “What a bad person I am!” But that’s the wrong lesson. God is calling us to be patient and to see ourselves as he does, with unconditional love.
  9. Reach out in charity. As we experience weakness and suffering during Lent, we should be renewed in our compassion for those who are hungry, suffering or otherwise in need. The third part of the Lenten formula is almsgiving. It’s about more than throwing a few extra dollars in the collection plate; it’s about reaching out to others and helping them without question as a way of sharing the experience of God’s unconditional love.
  10. Learn to love like Christ. Giving of ourselves in the midst of our suffering and self-denial brings us closer to loving like Christ, who suffered and poured himself out unconditionally on cross for all of us. Lent is a journey through the desert to the foot of the cross on Good Friday, as we seek him out, ask his help, join in his suffering, and learn to love like him.


Our Parish
Our community strives to love and serve God through worship, prayer, service and growth in knowledge of Our Catholic Faith.  If you wish to come for a tour and would like a guide, please let us know and we’ll do our best to set something up.  If you wish to just stop by and pray during the day, you are always welcome to do so.


Celebrating Vocations
By focusing on faith, knowledge, and service, Catholic schools prepare children to use their God-given talents to the fullest later in life. National Catholic Schools Week offers an opportunity for students to explore the many life paths that enable them to use their talents well in the service of God and others — by answering the call to a religious vocation, nurturing a family through sacramental marriage, by volunteering in church activities and charities, and/or by pursuing a career that makes the world a better place.

Serving Others
A central aspect of Catholic education is learning the importance of service to others. When students take part in service activities—both local and beyond—they demonstrate the values and faith they gain through their Catholic education and learn how to make the world a better place. When they observe how others serve the community, they gain an appreciation for how they can continue to serve others their entire lives.

Our School Mission Statement

Where learning and virtue are sacred.
  • We let God into every part of the day.
  • Full potential reached through challenging academic standards.
  • Parents can trust their children are safe and loved.
  • Discipline on developmental virtue.
  • Developing God-given gifts while serving others.
  • Classrooms are managed with guidance while enabling independence.

Our Parish Mission Statement

We as Catholics and as members of sacred Heart Parish, look to our Pope, our Bishop and our Pastor for spiritual guidance and direction in our lives. We as Christians are called by God to listen to His Word, to grow in holiness and to form a community of faith who are concerned for the needs of one another. We are called to worship God, to receive the Sacraments, to learn the truths of our faith and to instruct others in these truths, to work for peace and justice and provide support and help to those among us who are in need.

Greetings in Christ!  Thank you so much for stopping by our website...we hope that the pictures and information here reveal to you just a little glimpse of how blessed we feel to be able to worship God in Hudson, Michigan.
 
If you walk in the doors to the Church that face west, you'll see our cornerstone on the right.  Our Church was dedicated in the early 1900's and has stood since then as a place for people to come and worship, pray and admire the physical beauty of this magnificent Church.  Everything, from the stain glass windows to the marble Reredo in the center of the Church are there to inspire us to wonder at the Holiness of our God and the generosity and faithfulness of those in Hudson who love Him.
 
Our community strives to love and serve God through worship, prayer, service and growth in knowledge of Our Catholic Faith.  We hope that you enjoy this webpage and come out to visit us.  Our mass, confession and adoration schedule are listed here on the webpage for your convenience.  If you wish to come for a tour and would like a guide, please let us know and we'll do our best to set something up.  If you wish to just stop by and pray during the day, you are always welcome to do so.
 
Enjoy your time on our webpage...God bless and keep you.

In Jesus,
Fr. Joseph J Krupp
Pastor, Sacred Heart Catholic Church - Hudson, MI
Pastor, St. Mary on the Lake Catholic Church - Manitou Beach, MI

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